Plasmavision (Business)

Please be noted that the products introduced here are no longer in production.
The following contents are from the product launch announcement.

History of Plasma & LCD Innovation

History

Since its establishment in 1935, Fujitsu has become a worldwide leader in video display technology, computers and information processing platforms, telecommunications systems, semiconductors and electronic devices. With more than 150,000 employees and operations in more than 100 countries worldwide, Fujitsu has grown into one of the most formidable technology developers and manufacturers in the world. From the development of Japan's first commercial computer in 1954 to the introduction of the world's first colour plasma monitor in 1993, Fujitsu continues its tradition of innovative and technological breakthroughs as the leading manufacturer of high-resolution plasma display monitors.

Innovation

It was a long time coming. Although research and development began in the 1960's, Fujitsu's – and the world's - first colour plasma display didn't appear until1993. Followed quickly by Fujitsu's first 42-inch plasma display in 1996. It was worth the wait. The new monitors offered an alternative and superior solution from traditional CRT displays, providing thin, lightweight displays with a groundbreaking viewing angle (160 degrees) and hitherto unmatched widescreen aspect ratio.

At the same time Fujitsu worked towards the development of the first digital video processor for plasma screens. The processor enabled Fujitsu to manufacture and introduce the first-ever HD (high-definition) plasma monitor in 1999. Fujitsu's subsequent developments in digital video processing led to the creation of the first single-chip AVM (Advanced Video Movement) digital processor, included in all Fujitsu Plasmavision monitors up to 2004.

The AVM processor not only improved processing speed but also featured the debut of Fujitsu's proprietary high definition content scaler, offering plasma buyers the precision image scaling only found previously in dedicated, high-end video scalers. The results were spectacular. In 2002, an AVM equipped display was the first plasma screen to win an Emmy award from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

In 2005 Fujitsu maintained its reputation of excellence by delivering its next generation video processor – AVM-II.

The AVM-II digital video signal processor adds low brightness, multi-gradiation processing and other new digital control technologies to the unique features provided by the AVM and AVM Plus video processors. This next-generation, high-quality imaging engine is designed to bring the best out of new high-definition content while retaining its award-winning ability to reproduce standard TV, multimedia and DVD sources.

AVM-II also allowed the company to enter the LCD front projection market with the introduction of its high resolution LCD-Projector, which twinned new 3LCD projection technology from Epson with the AVM-II video processor to challenge the perception that LCD was not suitable for high-end projectors.

The new projector has already won plaudits as the first LCD-based projector to offer buyers an alternative to the 3-chip DLP projectors that dominate the top end of the home theatre projector market and is one of the few projectors that will accept a true 1080p signal.

 

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